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dc.contributor.authorCárdenas Fuentes, Gabriela
dc.contributor.authorHoms, Clara
dc.contributor.authorRamírez Contreras, Catalina
dc.contributor.authorJuton, Charlotte
dc.contributor.authorCasas Esteve, Rafael
dc.contributor.authorGrau, Maria
dc.contributor.authorAguilar Palacio, Isabel
dc.contributor.authorFitó, Montserrat
dc.contributor.authorGómez Santos, Santiago Felipe
dc.contributor.authorSchröder, Helmut
dc.date.accessioned2022-01-18T10:34:51Z
dc.date.available2022-01-18T10:34:51Z
dc.date.issued2021-12-30
dc.identifier.issn2072-6643
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10459.1/72776
dc.description.abstractEvidence has identified unhealthy lifestyle behaviors as the main contributors to obesity in children, so it is essential to identify factors that could influence children's lifestyles. The objective of the present study was to analyze the association of baseline maternal educational level with child's physical activity, screen time, and dietary habits at follow-up. This community-based cohort study was carried out between 2012 and 2014 and included 1405 children aged 8 to 10 years old. Maternal educational level was used as an indicator of child's socioeconomic status. Physical activity, screen time, and dietary habits were assessed by validated questionnaires. The odds of having commercially baked goods for breakfast [OR 1.47 (95% CI 1.03 to 2.10)], going more than once a week to a fast-food restaurant [OR 1.64 (95% CI 1.20 to 2.26)], and taking sweets and candys several times a day [OR 3.23 (95% CI 2.14 to 4.87) were significantly higher among children whose mothers had a lower educational level compared to their peers whose mothers had a higher level. These associations held for taking sweets and candy several times a day after additional adjustment for the corresponding dietary behavior at baseline. Maternal educational level was inversely associated (p < 0.001) with child's screen time at follow up and being in the lowest maternal educational category was associated with an increased odds of surpassing the maximum recommended time of screen time of 120 min per day (OR (95% CI) 1.43 (1.07 to 1.90), p = 0.016). Maternal education is a predictor for unhealthy dietary habits and high screen time in children.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by a grant from Instituto de Salud Carlos III FEDER, (PI11/01900).Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) is an initiativeof the Instituto de Salud Carlos III (ISCIII) of Spain, which is financed by the European RegionalDevelopment Fund (ERDF), “A way to make Europe”/“Investing in your future” (CB06/03). Itis supported by the official funding agency for biomedical research of the Spanish government,ISCIII, Spain.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherMDPI
dc.relation.isformatofReproducció del document publicat a: https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14010160
dc.relation.ispartofNutrients, 2021, vol. 14, núm. 1, p. 160
dc.rightscc-by (c) authors, 2021
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectLifestyle behaviors in children
dc.subjectMaternal educational level
dc.subjectDiet quality
dc.subjectSedentary behaviors
dc.subjectPhysical Activity
dc.titleProspective Association of Maternal Educational Level with Child's Physical Activity, Screen Time, and Diet Quality
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.date.updated2022-01-18T10:34:51Z
dc.identifier.idgrec031964
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3390/nu14010160


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Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as cc-by (c) authors, 2021