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dc.contributor.authorYuste, Silvia
dc.contributor.authorMacià i Puig, Ma Alba
dc.contributor.authorMotilva Casado, Mª José
dc.contributor.authorPrieto Diez, Neus
dc.contributor.authorRomero Fabregat, Mª Paz
dc.contributor.authorPedret, Anna
dc.contributor.authorSolà, Rosa
dc.contributor.authorLudwig, Iziar A.
dc.contributor.authorRubió Piqué, Laura
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-21T08:52:18Z
dc.date.issued2020
dc.identifier.issn2042-6496
dc.identifier.issn2042-650X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10459.1/71095
dc.description.abstractThe present study evaluated the impact of different thermal (infrared-drying, hot air-drying and purée pas-teurization) and non-thermal (freeze-drying) processing technologies on red-fleshed apple (poly)phenoliccompounds. We further investigated the processing effect on the (poly)phenol bioavailability in a crossoverpostprandial study where three subjects consumed three apple products (freeze-dried snack, hot air-driedsnack and pasteurized purée). (Poly)phenolic compounds present in the apple products and their biologicalmetabolites in urine were analyzed using liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). When comparing different processes, infrared-drying caused important losses in most of the apple(poly)phenolics, while hot air-drying and purée pasteurization maintained approximately 83% and 65% oftotal (poly)phenols compared with the freeze-dried snack, respectively. Anthocyanins in particular weredegraded to a higher extent, and hot air-dried apple and pasteurized purée maintained respectively 26%and 9% compared with freeze-dried apple snack. The acute intake showed that pasteurized purée exhibitedthe highest (poly)phenol bioavailability, followed by hot air-drying and freeze-dried snack, highlighting theimpact of processing on (poly)phenols absorption. In conclusion, for obtaining affordable new red-fleshedapple products with enhanced (poly)phenol bioavailability, purée pasteurization and hot air-drying representviable techniques. However, to obtain a red-fleshed apple snack with high anthocyanin content, freeze-drying is the technique that best preserves them.ca_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported by the Spanish Ministry of Industry, Economy and Competitiveness (MINECO) through the AGL2016-76943-C2-1-R and AGL2016-76943-C2-2-R projects (co-funded by the Agencia Estatal de Investigación (AEI) and the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF)); Iziar A. Ludwig was supported by the Spanish Ministry of Industry, Economy and Competitiveness (Juan de la Cierva, FJCI-2014-20689) and 2017PMF-POST2-19 The Martí I Franqués Research Grants Programme Universitat Rovira i Virgili (Reus, Tarragona, Spain); and Silvia Yuste through a grant by the University of Lleida. In addition, the authors are grateful to NUFRI SAT (Mollerussa, Lleida, Catalonia, Spain) for providing the red-fleshed apples.ca_ES
dc.language.isoengca_ES
dc.publisherThe Royal Society of Chemistryca_ES
dc.relationMINECO/PN2013-2016/AGL2016-76943-C2-1-Rca_ES
dc.relationMINECO/PN2013-2016/AGL2016-76943-C2-2-Rca_ES
dc.relation.isformatofVersió postprint del document publicat a https://doi.org/10.1039/d0fo02631jca_ES
dc.relation.ispartofFood and Function, 2020, vol. 11, p. 10436-10447ca_ES
dc.rights© The Royal Society of Chemistry, 2020ca_ES
dc.subjectRed-fleshed appleca_ES
dc.subject(poly)phenol compositionca_ES
dc.subjectBioavailability affectedca_ES
dc.titleThermal and non-thermal processing of red-fleshed apple: how are (poly)phenol composition and bioavailability affected?ca_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca_ES
dc.identifier.idgrec030914
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersionca_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/embargoedAccessca_ES
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1039/d0fo02631j
dc.date.embargoEndDate2021-11-17


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