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dc.contributor.authorGarrido, Victoria
dc.contributor.authorSánchez, Samanta
dc.contributor.authorSan Román, Beatriz
dc.contributor.authorFraile Sauce, Lorenzo José
dc.contributor.authorMigura Garcia, Lourdes
dc.contributor.authorGrilló, María Jesús
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-24T08:43:07Z
dc.date.available2020-12-06T23:13:48Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1535-3141
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10459.1/68088
dc.description.abstractSalmonellosis is one of the main foodborne diseases worldwide. Breeding sows asymptomatically infected with Salmonella can transmit the pathogen to piglets and humans. The isolation of Salmonella from mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) is considered a demonstration of asymptomatic infection in swine. As previous breeding sow studies have been performed using feces, the aim of this work was to study the occurrence of Salmonella infections by sampling MLNs, in comparison to their serological status. First, Salmonella fecal shedding was studied in 12/16 large breeding farms to establish the framework of study. Then, MLN (n = 264) and blood (n = 237) samples were obtained at an abattoir from sows of 15 of these 16 breeding farms. Additionally, risk factors associated with Salmonella MLN infection were analyzed. A total of 6.1% (16/264) sows, distributed in 40% (6/15) of the farms, had the pathogen in MLN. Salmonella Typhimurium was the most frequent serovar isolated. Interestingly, 43.8% (7/16) of MLN isolates were susceptible to all the antimicrobials tested and were found distributed throughout all farms with at least one sow positive. As well, one isolate of the emerging DT195 clone was detected and found to be resistant to six antibiotic families (ASSuTNx-Cfx). The serovars and the resistance profiles of the Salmonella isolates from feces were completely different to those obtained from MLNs. The seroprevalence (41.8% of sows and 100% of farms) was higher than that of MLN infections, showing no concordance (k = 0.15) between these two diagnostic tests in sows. Strategies directed to correct two risk factors (i.e., administration of dry food and old premises) would most likely help to reduce Salmonella infections in breeding sows.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe work was financed by Departamento de Industria, Energía e Innovación of the Navarra Government [reference IIQ14064.RI1] and Instituto Navarro de Tecnología e Infraestructuras Agroalimentarias S.A. -INTIA- [reference CAM2011030054]. VG, SS, BSR and LMG contracts were funded by UPNA postdoctoral fellowship, Erasmus Mundus EMUNDUS18 Program, CSIC JAE-Doc Program, and INIA-European Social Fund, respectively. We are grateful to farmers, veterinaries and slaughterhouse workers as well as to the temporal students Naroa Remondegui, June Landa (JAE-Intro CSIC-FEDER fellowship), Ruth Erro and Mirian Samblas.
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherMary Ann Liebert, Inc.
dc.relation.isformatofVersió postprint del document publicat a: https://doi.org/10.1089/fpd.2019.2708
dc.relation.ispartofFoodborne Pathogens And Disease, 2020, vol. 17, núm. 6, p. 411-417
dc.rights(c) Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., 2019
dc.subjectSalmonella
dc.subjectSows
dc.subjectLymph nodes
dc.subjectAntimicrobial resistance
dc.subjectRisk factors
dc.titleSalmonella infection in mesenteric lymph nodes of breeding sows
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.date.updated2020-02-24T08:43:07Z
dc.identifier.idgrec029127
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersion
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1089/fpd.2019.2708


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