Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorde la Fuente Oliver, Gabriel
dc.contributor.authorYáñez-Ruiz, D. R.
dc.contributor.authorSeradj, Ahmad Reza
dc.contributor.authorBalcells Terés, Joaquim
dc.contributor.authorBelanche, A.
dc.date.accessioned2019-12-12T11:12:16Z
dc.date.available2019-12-12T11:12:16Z
dc.date.issued2019-02-10
dc.identifier.issn1836-5787
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10459.1/67711
dc.description.abstractMethane is the main greenhouse gas contributor to global warming in the livestock sector; it is generated by anaerobic fermentation in the different sections of the gut, and differs significantly among species. Methane is only produced by a certain type of microorganisms called methanogens. The species composition of methanogenic archaea population is largely affected by the diet, geographical location, host and the section of the gut. Consequently, methane production, either measured as total grams emitted per day or per body weight mass, differs greatly between animal species. The main difference between methanogenic activity in different gut sections and animal species is the substrate fermented and the metabolic pathway to complete anaerobic fermentation of plant material. The three main substrates used by methanogens are CO2, acetate and compounds containing methyl groups. The three dominant orders of methanogens in gut environments are Methanomicrobiales, Methanobacteriales and Methanosarcinales. They normally are present in low numbers (below 3 % of total microbiome). This review will describe the main metabolic pathways and methanogens involved in CH4 production in the gut of different host animal, species, as well as discuss general trends that influence such emissions, such as geographical distribution, feed composition, section of the gut, host age and diurnal/season variation. Finally, the review will describe animal species (large and small domestic ruminants, wild ruminants, camelids, pigs, rabbits, horses, macropods, termites and humans) specificities in the methanogens diversity and their effects on methane emission.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by FEDER/Ministerio de Ciencia, Innovación yUniversidades - Agencia Estatal de Investigación (grant number AGL2017-89289) and European Union's H2020 program under National Institutes ofHealth (Feed-a-Gene, grant number 633531).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherCSIRO Publishing
dc.relationMINECO/PN2017-2020/AGL2017-89289
dc.relation.isformatofVersió postprint del document publicat a: https://doi.org/10.1071/AN17701
dc.relation.ispartofAnimal Production Science, 2019, vol. 59, num. 12, p. 2109-2122
dc.rights(c) CSIRO, 2019
dc.subjectDigestive compartments
dc.subjectEmission
dc.subjectMethane production
dc.subjectMethanogens
dc.subjectMicrobiota
dc.titleMethanogenesis in animals with foregut and hindgut fermentation: a review
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.date.updated2019-12-12T11:12:17Z
dc.identifier.idgrec028771
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/acceptedVersion
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1071/AN17701
dc.relation.projectIDinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020/633531/EU/Feed-a-Gene


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record