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dc.contributor.authorGranado-Serrano, Ana Belén
dc.contributor.authorMartín Garí, Meritxell
dc.contributor.authorSánchez, V.
dc.contributor.authorRiart Solans, M.
dc.contributor.authorBerdún Hernández, Rebeca
dc.contributor.authorLudwig, Iziar A.
dc.contributor.authorRubió Piqué, Laura
dc.contributor.authorVilaprinyo Terré, Ester
dc.contributor.authorPortero Otín, Manuel
dc.contributor.authorSerrano Casasola, José Carlos Enrique
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-28T09:31:41Z
dc.date.available2019-02-28T09:31:41Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10459.1/65826
dc.description.abstractGut microbiota has been suggested to affect lipid metabolism. The objective of this study was to characterize the faecal microbiota signature and both short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) and bile acids (BA) profile of hypercholesterolemic subjects. Microbiota composition, SCFAs, BA and blood lipid profile from male volunteers with hypercholesterolemia (HC) and normocholesterolemia (NC) were determined by 16S rDNA sequencing, HPLC, GC and NMR, respectively. HC subjects were characterized by having lower relative abundance of Anaeroplasma (0.002% vs 0.219%, p-value = 0.026) and Haemophilus (0.041% vs 0.078%, p-value = 0.049), and higher of Odoribacter (0.51% vs 0.16%; p-value = 0.044). Correlation analysis revealed that Anaeroplasma and Haemophilus were associated to an unfavourable lipid profile: they correlated negatively to cholesterol and triglycerides related biomarkers and the ratio total to high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, and positively to HDL size. Odoribacter displayed an opposite behaviour. Faecal SCFAs profile revealed higher abundance of isobutyric (2.76% vs 0.82%, p-value = 0.049) and isovaleric acid (1.32% vs 0.06%, p-value = 0.016) in HC. Isobutyric acid correlated positively with Odoribacter and lipid parameters indicative of an unfavourable profile. BA profile did not show differences between groups. It was concluded that HC subjects showed a particular faecal bacterial signature and SCFAs profile associated with their lipid profile.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe research leading to these results has received funding from the People Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of the Seventh Framework Programme of the European Union (FP7/2007-2013) under REA grant agreement No. 600388 (TECNIOspring Progamme) and from the Agency for Business Competitiveness of the Government of Catalonia ACCIÓ that support the fellowship given to Ana Belén Granado-Serrano (TECSPR14-0-0023). I.A.L enjoys a post-doctoral contract (2017PMF-POST2-19) from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement and from the Universitat Rovira i Virgili (URV).
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.language.isoeng
dc.publisherNature Research
dc.relation.isformatofReproducció del document publicat a: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-38874-3
dc.relation.ispartofScientific Reports, 2019, vol. 9, núm. 1772, p. 1-13
dc.rightscc-by (c) Granado-Serrano, Ana Belén et al., 2019
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/es
dc.subjectHypercholesterolemia
dc.subjectFaecal bacteria
dc.subjectshort chain fatty acids
dc.subjectBranched short chain fatty acids
dc.subjectBile acids
dc.titleFaecal bacterial and short-chain fatty acids signature in hypercholesterolemia
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.date.updated2019-02-28T09:31:47Z
dc.identifier.idgrec028252
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-38874-3
dc.relation.projectIDinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/FP7/600388


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cc-by (c) Granado-Serrano, Ana Belén et al., 2019
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as cc-by (c) Granado-Serrano, Ana Belén et al., 2019