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dc.contributor.authorAbecia, Leticia
dc.contributor.authorBalcells Terés, Joaquim
dc.contributor.authorFondevila, Manuel
dc.contributor.authorBelenguer, Álvaro
dc.contributor.authorHoltrop, G.
dc.contributor.authorLobley, Gerald E.
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-16T08:04:20Z
dc.date.available2018-10-16T08:04:20Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.issn0007-1145
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10459.1/64879
dc.description.abstractThe contribution of microbial amino acids through caecotrophy to tissue protein metabolism was investigated in lactating does. Attempts were made to vary microbial supply through a dietary antibiotic, Zn bacitracin, and to vary tissue demand through manipulation of litter size. Three groups of eight New Zealand does were fed different experimental diets from day 28 of pregnancy to day 26 of lactation. The control group received the basal diet formulated to meet requirements with grass hay, wheat, soyabean meal and barley grain. The second (no antibiotic) group and the third (bacitracin; BAC) group ingested the basal diet supplemented with ammonium sulfate (5 g/kg), initially unlabelled (day 1 to day 8) then labelled with 15N (day 9 to day 30), while the BAC diet was also supplemented throughout with antibiotic (Zn bacitracin; 100 mg/kg). From just after birth each group of does was subdivided into two groups, each of four females, with the litter size either five (LS5) or nine (LS9) pups. The 15N enrichment in liver, milk and caecal bacteria amino acids was determined by GC-combustion-isotope ratio MS. All amino acids in bacterial protein were enriched with the (15NH4)2SO4 treatment, with lysine 15N enrichment significantly greater in caecal bacteria (0·23 (SE 0·0063) atom % excess (ape)) than in liver (0·04 (SE 0·0004) ape) or milk protein (0·05 (SE 0·0018) ape), confirming the double origin (bacterial and dietary) of tissue lysine. The contribution of microbes to tissue lysine was 0·23 (SE 0·006) when milk protein was used as reference.ca_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipWork was financed by the Dirección General de Aragón (DGA), through the Research Project reference PM 095/2006. L. A. was funded by a doctoral fellowship (Programa de Formación de Investigadores del Departamento de Educación, Universidades e Investigación del Gobierno Vasco) and by a Marie Curie Training site award (HPMT-CT-2001-00409) during her stage at the Rowett Research Institute. Part of the present study was funded by core grants to the Rowett Research Institute, and Biomathematics and Statistics Scotland (BioSS) by the Scottish Executive.ca_ES
dc.language.isoengca_ES
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressca_ES
dc.relation.isformatofReproducció del document publicat a https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114508957986ca_ES
dc.relation.ispartofBritish Journal of Nutrition, 2008, vol. 100, núm. 5, p. 977-983ca_ES
dc.rights(c) Cambridge University Press, 2008ca_ES
dc.subjectCaecotrophyca_ES
dc.subjectRabbit doesca_ES
dc.subjectMicrobial lysineca_ES
dc.titleContribution of gut microbial lysine to liver and milk amino acids in lactating doesca_ES
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleca_ES
dc.identifier.idgrec014461
dc.type.versioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersionca_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessca_ES
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114508957986


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