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dc.contributor.authorAtanackovic, Valentina
dc.contributor.authorJuárez Escario, Alejandro
dc.contributor.authorRecasens i Guinjuan, Jordi
dc.contributor.authorTorra Farré, Joel
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-16T09:03:51Z
dc.date.available2017-06-16T09:03:51Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1444-6162
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10459.1/59891
dc.description.abstractThe presence of herbicide-resistant Lolium rigidum in Mediterranean (Spanish) citrus orchards was reported in 2005 and it poses a serious threat to crop management. The main objective of this research was to investigate which components could be responsible for the persistence of annual ryegrass populations in Mediterranean mandarin and orange orchards. This is the first study regarding L. rigidum populations in Mediterranean citrus orchards. Surveys were con- ducted in 55 commercial citrus orchards in eastern Spain in 2013 by interviewing technicians who were working in cooperatives about crop management. The level of infestation by L. rigidum and the presence of harvester ants (Messor barbarus) then were estimated in the same orchards. The variables were subjected to a two-dimensional analysis and both univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were fitted for each of the three L. rigidum density levels that had been established. The multivariate models showed the significant factors that were associated with various L. rigidum densities: (i) at a low density, the herbicides that were applied, the number of applications in 2013 and the type of irrigation (flood or drip); (ii) at a medium density, the presence of harvester ants; and (iii) at a high density, the herbicides that were applied in 2013. The results indicated that drip irrigation and one application of glyphosate mixed with other herbicides (or herbicides other than glyphosate) were associated with a lower L. rigidum density. The alternative management options that are presented here should help farmers to reduce weed problems in Mediterranean citrus orchards. Future research is required to better understand the presence of herbicide-resistant populations, as well as the possible beneficial presence of granivorous ant species.ca_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was funded by Monsanto Company, Monsanto Europe SA, Antwerp, Belgium. We thank technician Alberto Allué for his help during the field research. We are grateful to the technicians from the nine cooperatives in the province of Castellon, Spain, for taking part in our questionnaire: Miriam Mestre, Ignacio Felis, Cesar Roures, Imma Ferrer, Vicente Masip, Santiago Costa, Vicente Llorens, Armando Albert, Jose Francisco Nebot and Santiago Mompo. The authors also would like to thank X. Espalader for his help with Messor species identification.ca_ES
dc.language.isoengca_ES
dc.publisherWeed Science Society of Japanca_ES
dc.relation.isformatofVersió postprint del document publicat a: https://doi.org/10.1111/wbm.12075ca_ES
dc.relation.ispartofWeed Biology and Management, vol. 15, p. 122-131ca_ES
dc.rights(c) Weed Science Society of Japan, 2015ca_ES
dc.subjectGlyphosateca_ES
dc.subjectHerbicide resistanceca_ES
dc.subjectrigid ryegrassca_ES
dc.subjectSeed predationca_ES
dc.titleA survey of Lolium rigidum populations in citrus orchards: Factors explaining infestation levelsca_ES
dc.typearticleca_ES
dc.identifier.idgrec023229
dc.type.versionacceptedVersionca_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessca_ES
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/wbm.12075


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