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dc.contributor.authorPons i Domènech, Xavier
dc.contributor.authorNúñez, Eva
dc.contributor.authorLumbierres i Bardají, Belén
dc.contributor.authorAlbajes Garcia, Ramon
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-10T10:38:05Z
dc.date.available2017-02-10T10:38:05Z
dc.date.issued2005
dc.identifier.issn1210-5759
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10459.1/59221
dc.description.abstractThe relative occurrence and seasonal abundance of aphidophagous predators (Insecta and Arachnida) were determined in alfalfa fields at two locations in the northeast Iberian Peninsula, using D-Vac and sweep-net sampling techniques. Among the insects, Heteroptera, Dermaptera, Neuroptera, Coleoptera and Diptera were found. The relative abundance of predators was similar at the two locations. Polyphagous predators were much more abundant than aphid specific species. Heteroptera were the most abundant order of insect predators: members of the Nabidae, Anthocoridae and Miridae were very common. Coleoptera were also abundant, represented mainly by the family Staphylinidae. Coccinellidae were less abundant and their occurrence coincided with maximum aphid presence. There was a low occurrence of other aphid-specific predators, i.e. Diptera: Syrphidae and Neuroptera: Chrysopidae. Arachnida varied between localities (from 35% to 65%). Over a five-year period, numerical responses by Orius spp., Nabis provencalis and Coccinellidae to aphids were found using polynomial regression models; however the abundance of predators was weakly explained by aphid abundance. Alfalfa, maize and winter cereals share similar aphid predator groups and these crops partially coincide in time, enabling the movement of predators among crops. The persistence of several predatory groups (Anthocoridae, Nabidae, Staphylinidae, Araneae) during most of the season suggests that alfalfa plays a major role as a reservoir of aphid predators.ca_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was funded by the Comisión Interministerial de Ciencia y Tecnología (Projects AGF96-0482, AGF99-0782) and by the Ministry of Science and Technology (Plan Nacional I+D+I, Project AGL 2002–204) of the Spanish Government. Eva Núñez was funded by a PhD grant from the Generalitat de Catalunya.ca_ES
dc.language.isoengca_ES
dc.publisherCzech Academy of Sciences. Institute of Entomology of the Biology Centreca_ES
dc.relationMIECU/PN1996-1999/AGF96-0482
dc.relationMIECU/PN1996-1999/AGF99-0782
dc.relationMICYT/PN2000-2003/AGL2002-204
dc.relation.isformatofReproducció del document publicat a https://doi.org/10.14411/eje.2005.074ca_ES
dc.relation.ispartofEuropean Journal of Entomology, 2005, vol. 102, núm. 3, p. 519-525ca_ES
dc.rightscc-by (c) Czech Academy of Sciences. Institute of Entomology of the Biology Centre, 2005ca_ES
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/es/*
dc.subjectAlfalfaca_ES
dc.subjectAphid predatorsca_ES
dc.subjectNabidaeca_ES
dc.subjectAnthocoridaeca_ES
dc.titleEpigeal aphidophagous predators and the role of alfalfa as a reservoir of aphid predators for arable cropsca_ES
dc.typearticleca_ES
dc.identifier.idgrec006757
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionca_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessca_ES
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.14411/eje.2005.074


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cc-by (c) Czech Academy of Sciences. Institute of Entomology of the Biology Centre, 2005
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