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dc.contributor.authorBayfield, Neil
dc.contributor.authorBarancok, Peter
dc.contributor.authorFurger, Markus
dc.contributor.authorSebastià, Ma. T.
dc.contributor.authorDomínguez, Gloria
dc.contributor.authorLapka, Miloslav
dc.contributor.authorCudlinova, Eva
dc.contributor.authorVescovo, Loris
dc.contributor.authorGanielle, Damiano
dc.contributor.authorCernusca, Alexander
dc.contributor.authorTappeiner, Ulrike
dc.contributor.authorDrösler, Matthias
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-15T09:45:04Z
dc.date.issued2008
dc.identifier.issn1432-9840
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10459.1/58820
dc.description.abstractThis article examines how alternative rural funding scenarios might influence the pattern of functional land types in mountain areas. The study aims were to explore the use of stakeholders to predict landscape change and to provide a future policy context for other papers in the Carbomont program. EU rural funding policies could have a strong influence on land use and landscapes in mountain areas. At eight sites across Europe, groups of local stakeholders were asked to compare the possible effects of three contrasting funding scenarios over an imagined period of 20 years on (1) the importance of the main land-use sectors; (2) the areas of the main land functional land types; and (3) the management of individual land types. Stakeholders also listed their interests in the area to help define the perspective of the group. The protocols used were ranking and scoring procedures that permitted quantification of changes and of the degree of consensus within the group. The scenarios were (1) continuation of current rural funding (status quo), (2) rapid reduction of farm income support (reduce support), and (3) increasing rural diversification funding (diversification). The eight countries sampled included five established EU members (UK, Germany, Austria, Italy, Spain), two new accession members (Czeck Republic and Slovakia), and Switzerland. There were predicted to be widespread reductions in the importance of the agricultural sector across Europe and increases in the transport, built environment, and tourism sectors. In general, the status quo scenario was perceived to be unsatisfactory in various respects, reduce support was worse, but diversification offered opportunities for conservation and development of mountain communities and land use. Changes in the areas of land types would mainly involve loss of arable and grazing land and increases in scrub, and settlements. Some elements of the landscape such as most forests, mountain tops, and wetlands would, however, be little affected by any of the scenarios.ca_ES
dc.language.isoengca_ES
dc.publisherSpringer Verlagca_ES
dc.relation.isformatofReproducció del document publicat a https://doi.org/10.1007/s10021-008-9197-1ca_ES
dc.relation.ispartofEcosystems, 2008, vol. 11, núm. 8, p. 1368-1382ca_ES
dc.rights(c) Springer Science Business Media B.V., 2008ca_ES
dc.subjectstakeholdersca_ES
dc.subjectrural funding scenariosca_ES
dc.subjectmountainsca_ES
dc.subjectlandscape changeca_ES
dc.titleStakeholder perceptions of the impacts of rural funding scenarios on mountain landscapes across Europeca_ES
dc.typearticleca_ES
dc.identifier.idgrec014529
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionca_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccessca_ES
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s10021-008-9197-1
dc.date.embargoEndDate10000-01-01


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