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dc.contributor.authorMarco Molés, Raquel
dc.contributor.authorRojas Grau, María Alejandra
dc.contributor.authorHernando, Isabel
dc.contributor.authorPérez Munuera, Isabel
dc.contributor.authorSoliva-Fortuny, Robert
dc.contributor.authorMartín Belloso, Olga
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-24T11:49:16Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.issn0022-1147
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10459.1/58648
dc.description.abstractAbstract:  Liquid whole egg (LWE) is currently pasteurized through the application of heat; however, this treatment entails deleterious effects against some of the functional and technological properties of the product. In this study, the effect of high-intensity pulsed electric fields (HIPEF) processing (field strength: 19, 32, and 37 kV/cm) was compared to the traditional heat pasteurization (66 °C for 4.5 min). Different physical and structural characteristics of LWE, subjected or not to homogenization, were evaluated and compared, having the untreated LWE as a reference. Thermal treatment caused an increase in the viscosity of LWE, especially in nonhomogenized samples. HIPEF treatments did not modify the original color of LWE, whereas thermally treated samples developed an opaque appearance. LWE treated at 19 and 32 kV/cm exhibited a similar foaming capacity as fresh untreated egg, whereas thermal processing and PEF treatments of 37 kV/cm caused a substantial decrease in the foaming capacity of untreated liquid egg. Regarding the microstructure, the lipoprotein matrix appeared to be less affected by the HIPEF than by heat treatment if compared to the control. In addition, heat pasteurization had a significant impact on both the water-soluble protein content of the LWE samples (19.5% to 23.6% decrease) and the mechanical properties of the egg gels (up to 21.3% and 14.5% increase in hardness and cohesiveness, respectively). On the other hand, these parameters were not substantially affected in the HIPEF-treated samples. Heat-induced gels obtained from HIPEF-treated samples did not exhibit remarkable differences in the water-holding capacity (WHC) with respect to heat-pasteurized samples.ca_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by the European Commission (project FP6-FOOD-023140). The authors are indebted to SIK, the Swedish Inst. for Food and Biotechnology (G¨oteborg, Sweden) for supplying the PEF-treated samples analyzed in this study and to the Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia (Spain) for the grant awarded to author R. Marco-Molés.ca_ES
dc.language.isoengca_ES
dc.publisherWiley online libraryca_ES
dc.relation.isformatofReproducció del document publicat a https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1750-3841.2010.02016.xca_ES
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of food science, 2011, vol. 76, núm. 2, p. C257–C264ca_ES
dc.rights(c) Institute of Food Technologists, 2011ca_ES
dc.subjectHigh-intensity pulsed electric fieldsca_ES
dc.subjectLiquid whole eggca_ES
dc.subjectMicrostructureca_ES
dc.subjectPhysical propertiesca_ES
dc.titlePhysical and Structural Changes in Liquid Whole Egg Treated with High-Intensity Pulsed Electric Fieldsca_ES
dc.typearticleca_ES
dc.identifier.idgrec016755
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionca_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccessca_ES
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/j.1750-3841.2010.02016.x
dc.date.embargoEndDate2025-01-01


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