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dc.contributor.authorRamessar, Koreen
dc.contributor.authorCapell Capell, Teresa
dc.contributor.authorTwyman, Richard M.
dc.contributor.authorQuemada, Hector
dc.contributor.authorChristou, Paul
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-23T09:57:09Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.issn1380-3743
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10459.1/58618
dc.description.abstractGenetically modified (GM) crops are now grown commercially in 23 countries, with another 29 granting approval for import and release into the environment. Despite the socio-economic and environmental benefits of the technology, further development is being hampered by differences in national regulatory frameworks relating to research, biosafety, and to the trade and use of GM crops. The biosafety regulations in different countries are based on five main international instruments that influence the development of national biosafety systems in terms of field trial permit requirements, risk assessment criteria, labeling, traceability, transparency, public awareness, post-monitoring and import regulations. The global harmonization of data collectionca_ES
dc.language.isoengca_ES
dc.publisherSpringer Verlagca_ES
dc.relation.isformatofReproducció del document publicat a https://doi.org/10.1007/s11032-008-9217-zca_ES
dc.relation.ispartofMolecular Breeding, 2009, vol. 23, núm. 1, p. 99-112ca_ES
dc.rights(c) Springer Science+Business Media B.V., 2008ca_ES
dc.subjectGM cropsca_ES
dc.subjectTransgenic plantsca_ES
dc.subjectRegulatory processca_ES
dc.subjectPrecautionary approachca_ES
dc.titleCalling the tunes on transgenic crops: the case for regulatory harmonyca_ES
dc.typearticleca_ES
dc.identifier.idgrec013147
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionca_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccessca_ES
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s11032-008-9217-z
dc.date.embargoEndDate10000-01-01


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