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dc.contributor.authorColinas, C. (Carlos)
dc.contributor.authorMolina, R.
dc.contributor.authorTrappe, J.
dc.contributor.authorPerry, D.
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-10T10:21:52Z
dc.date.issued1994
dc.identifier.issn0028-646X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10459.1/58460
dc.description.abstractInoculation of planting holes with small amounts of soil from a mature forest or a plantation can improve formation of ectomycorrhizas on Pseudotsuga mensiesii (Mirb.) Franco seedlings in degraded eleareuts in southwestern Oregon. To determine the component (s) of transferred soil responsible for increased ectomycorrhiza formation, we treated soil from a clearcut, a mature forest, and a plantation with one of the following: fertilizer to test for the effect of nutrients, dimethoate and carbufuran to test for the effect on microarthropods or nematodes, fumagillin to test for the effect on protozoa, captan to test for the effect on fungi, penicillin and oxytetracycline to test for the effect on bacteria, pasteurization to test for the effect of active forms of organisms. Tyndallization to test for the effect of resting forms of organisms, or water as a control. We studied the effect of inoculation with soil subjected to these treatments on number and types of ectomycorrhizas, and length of active mycelium, and number of active bacteria in the rhizosphere. Inoculation with untreated forest or plantation soils increased the number of ectomyeorrhizas but did not change the mycorrhizal types present. Most agents had different effects in different soils, inoculation with pasteurized and Tvndallized clearcut and plantation soils increased the number of Rhizopagon- and Thelephora-type ectomyeorrhizas and decreased the number of active bacteria, as did untreated forest soil. We hypothesize that the role of the soil transfer is to provide a rhizosphere environment free from a deleterious organism present in the clearcut. In this environment, beneficial organisms present in the clearcut or brought in with the seedling from the nursery can proliferate.ca_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipWe appreciate the funding provided by the USDA, Forest Service Fiicitic Northwest Research Station's Long-term Ecosystem Productivity Program and a scholarship to C.C. from the Spanish Ministry of Agriculture, Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Agrarias. This is Paper 2874 of the Forest Research Laboratory, Oregon State University.ca_ES
dc.language.isoengca_ES
dc.publisherWileyca_ES
dc.relation.isformatofReproducció del document publicat a https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.1994.tb03971.xca_ES
dc.relation.ispartofNew Phytologist, 1994, vol. 127, núm. 3, p. 529-537ca_ES
dc.rights(c) John Wiley and Sons, 1994ca_ES
dc.subjectEctomycorrhizaca_ES
dc.subjectBiocidesca_ES
dc.subjectSoil inoculumca_ES
dc.subjectRestoration ecologyca_ES
dc.titleEctomycorrhizas and rhizosphere microorganisms of seedlings of Pseudotsuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco planted on a degraded site and inoculated with forest soils pretreated with selective biocidesca_ES
dc.typearticleca_ES
dc.identifier.idgrec007923
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionca_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccessca_ES
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/j.1469-8137.1994.tb03971.x
dc.date.embargoEndDate10000-01-01


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