Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorZhang, Yi-Bo
dc.contributor.authorCastañé Fernández, Cristina
dc.contributor.authorGabarra i Ambert, Rosa
dc.contributor.authorAlbajes Garcia, Ramon
dc.contributor.authorWan, Fang-Hao
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-09T09:12:33Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn1672-9609
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10459.1/58431
dc.description.abstractIn autoparasitoids, females are generally primary endoparasitoids of Hemiptera, while males are hyperparasitoids developing in or on conspecific females or other primary parasitoids. Female-host acceptance can be influenced by extrinsic and/or intrinsic factors. In this paper, we are concerned with intrinsic factors such as nutritional status, mating status, etc. We observed the behavior of Encarsia pergandiella Howard (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) females when parasitizing primary (3rd instar larvae of Bemisia tabaci Gennadius [Homoptera: Aleyrodidae]) and secondary hosts (3rd instar larvae and pupae of Eretmocerus mundus Mercet [Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae]) for a period of 1 h. Females had different reproductive (virgin or mated younger) and physiological (fed elder or mated elder) status. Virgin females killed a large number of secondary hosts while investing a long time per host. However, they did not feed upon them. Mated females killed a lower number of secondary hosts and host feeding was observed in both consuming primary and secondary hosts. It was common to observe host examining females of all physiological statues tested repeatedly stinging the same hosts when parasitizing, killing or rejecting them. Fed elder females parasitized more B. tabaci larvae than E. mundus larvae or pupae, while investing less time on the primary host than on the secondary host. They also parasitized more B. tabaci larvae than mated elder females, while investing less time per host. The access of females to honey allowed them to lay more eggs.ca_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipY. B. Zhang greatly appreciated a study grant from the European Commission, to accomplish his study at Institute for Research and Technology in Agriculture (IRTA), Cabrils, Spain. This grant was provided through the project from the Asia Link program CN/Asia- Link/035 (129–036): “Tackling BIOSECurity between Europe and Asia: innovative detection, containment and control tools of Invasive Alien Species potentially affecting food production and trade (BIOSEC).” This study was also financially supported by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through the project AGL2010–18811.ca_ES
dc.language.isoengca_ES
dc.publisherWileyca_ES
dc.relationMICINN/PN2008-2011/AGL2010-18811
dc.relation.isformatofReproducció del document publicat a https://doi.org/10.1111/1744-7917.12152ca_ES
dc.relation.ispartofInsect Science, 2015, vol. 22, núm. 6, p. 793-802ca_ES
dc.rights(c) Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 2014ca_ES
dc.subjectDirect observationca_ES
dc.subjectFemale physiological statusca_ES
dc.subjectHeteronomous hyperparasitoidsca_ES
dc.subjectHost acceptance behaviorca_ES
dc.titleHost selection by the autoparasitoid Encarsia pergandiella on primary (Bemisia tabaci) and secondary (Eretmocerus mundus) hostsca_ES
dc.typearticleca_ES
dc.identifier.idgrec025097
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionca_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccessca_ES
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1111/1744-7917.12152
dc.date.embargoEndDate10000-01-01


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record