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dc.contributor.authorMartín Peláez, Sandra María
dc.contributor.authorCastañer, Olga
dc.contributor.authorSolà, Rosa
dc.contributor.authorMotilva Casado, Mª José
dc.contributor.authorCastell, Margarida
dc.contributor.authorPérez Cano, Francisco José
dc.contributor.authorFitó, Montserrat
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-19T10:07:55Z
dc.date.available2016-09-19T10:07:55Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn2072-6643
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10459.1/57816
dc.description.abstractOlive oil (OO) phenolic compounds (PC) are able to influence gut microbial populations and metabolic output. Our aim was to investigate whether these compounds and changes affect the mucosal immune system. In a randomized, controlled, double blind cross-over human trial, for three weeks, preceded by two-week washout periods, 10 hypercholesterolemic participants ingested 25 mL/day of three raw virgin OO differing in their PC concentration and origin: (1) an OO containing 80 mg PC/kg (VOO); (2) a PC-enriched OO containing 500 mg PC/kg from OO (FVOO); and (3) a PC-enriched OO containing a mixture of 500 mg PC/kg from OO and thyme (1:1, FVOOT). Intestinal immunity (fecal immunoglobulin A (IgA) and IgA-coated bacteria) and inflammation markers (C-reactive protein (CRP) and fecal interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor (TNF ) and calprotectin) was analyzed. The ingestion of high amounts of OO PC, as contained in FVOO, tended to increase the proportions of IgA-coated bacteria and increased plasma levels of CRP. However, lower amounts of OO PC (VOO) and the combination of two PC sources (FVOOT) did not show significant effects on the variables investigated. Results indicate a potential stimulation of the immune system with very high doses of OO PC, which should be further investigated.ca_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThe project was also supported by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitveness (MINECO; AGL2009-13517-C03-01, AGL2009-13517-C03-02, AGL2009-13517-C03-03), and by grants from ISCIII FEDER (CB06/03/0028), and AGAUR (2014SGR240).ca_ES
dc.language.isoengca_ES
dc.publisherMDPIca_ES
dc.relationMICINN/PN2008-2011/AGL2009-13517-C03-01ca_ES
dc.relationMICINN/PN2008-2011/AGL2009-13517-C03-02ca_ES
dc.relationMICINN/PN2008-2011/AGL2009-13517-C03-03ca_ES
dc.relation.isformatofReproducció del document publicat a https://doi.org/10.3390/nu8040213ca_ES
dc.relation.ispartofNutrients, 2016, vol. 8, núm. 4, p. 213 (1-14)ca_ES
dc.rightscc-by-nc-sa (c) Martín-Peláez et al., 2016ca_ES
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/*
dc.subjectOlive oilca_ES
dc.subjectPhenolic compoundsca_ES
dc.subjectGut microbiotaca_ES
dc.subjectMucosal immunityca_ES
dc.subjectIgA-coated bacteriaca_ES
dc.titleInfluence of phenol-enriched olive oils on human intestinal immune functionca_ES
dc.typearticleca_ES
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionca_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessca_ES
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.3390/nu8040213


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cc-by-nc-sa (c) Martín-Peláez et al., 2016
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as cc-by-nc-sa (c) Martín-Peláez et al., 2016