Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorBrückner, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Selina
dc.contributor.authorMiró, Laia
dc.contributor.authorRadspieler, Michael
dc.contributor.authorCabeza, Luisa F.
dc.contributor.authorLävemann, Eberhard
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-14T09:16:36Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.issn0306-2619
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10459.1/57196
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, the potential of industrial waste heat for heating and cooling applications is investigated. Therefore, heat transformation technologies are presented and their technical and economic potential are discussed. First, different industrial processes and their operating temperatures are presented as possible waste heat sources as well as low temperature processes, which can be supplied with waste heat. Then, a general economic analysis is performed for three different cases of waste heat use: an absorption chiller producing cold and heat production with a compression and an absorption heat pump. The maximum acceptable investment cost for each technology is estimated and compared with the current investment cost depending on the operating hours of the system. For this, three different consumer types, Enthusiast, Real Estate and Industry, are defined to represent different expectations in interest rate, payback period and the resulting annuity factor. Instead of judging if a technology is profitable or not, it is calculated how much the system is allowed to cost in order to be competitive for certain operating hours. Combined with present day cost of the technology, this serves as a rough judgment of the market deployment process. Finally, a sensitivity analysis of the initial assumptions for the economic analysis is performed, revealing a strong influence of the annuity factor. For the present day technology cost, absorption chillers were found to be profitable for two of the three consumer types when operated for at least 2500 h per year. Electric heat pumps are profitable for all consumer types when exceeding 4000 operating hours per year while absorption heat pumps start at 3000 h of operation per year to be profitable for all consumer types.ca_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was partially funded by BMWi the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (project FKZ 0327383B Mobile Sorption Heat Storage) and the Spanish government (project ENE2011-22722). The authors would also like to thank the Catalan Government for the quality accreditation given to their research group GREA (2014 SGR 123). Sarah Brückner would like to thank Stiftung der Deutschen Wirtschaft for her research fellow-ship. Selina Liu would like to thank DAAD for her internship fellowship within the RISE Program. Laia Miró would like to thank the Spanish Government for her research fellowship (BES-2012-051861).ca_ES
dc.language.isoengca_ES
dc.publisherElsevierca_ES
dc.relationMICINN/PN2008-2011/ENE2011-22722ca_ES
dc.relation.isformatofReproducció del document publicat a https://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2015.01.147ca_ES
dc.relation.ispartofApplied Energy, 2015, vol. 151, p. 157-167ca_ES
dc.rights(c) Elsevier, 2015ca_ES
dc.subjectIndustrial waste heatca_ES
dc.subjectEconomic analysisca_ES
dc.subjectHeat transformation technologiesca_ES
dc.titleIndustrial waste heat recovery technologies: An economic analysis of heat transformation technologiesca_ES
dc.typearticleca_ES
dc.identifier.idgrec022707
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionca_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccessca_ES
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.apenergy.2015.01.147
dc.date.embargoEndDate10000-01-01


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record