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dc.contributor.authorPujol Salud, Jesús
dc.contributor.authorBatalla, Iolanda
dc.contributor.authorContreras-Rodríguez, Oren
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, Ben J.
dc.contributor.authorPera Guardiola, Vanessa
dc.contributor.authorHernández-Ribas, Rosa
dc.contributor.authorReal, Eva
dc.contributor.authorBosa, Laura
dc.contributor.authorSoriano-Mas, Carles
dc.contributor.authorDeus Yela, Juan
dc.contributor.authorLópez-Solà, Marina
dc.contributor.authorPifarré Paredero, Josep
dc.contributor.authorMenchón, José M.
dc.contributor.authorCardoner, N. (Narcís)
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-01T09:32:46Z
dc.date.issued2012
dc.identifier.issn1749-5016
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10459.1/57140
dc.description.abstractNeuroimaging research has demonstrated the involvement of a well-defined brain network in the mediation of moral judgment in normal population, and has suggested the inappropriate network use in criminal psychopathy. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to prove that alterations in the brain network subserving moral judgment in criminal psychopaths are not limited to the inadequate network use during moral judgment, but that a primary network breakdown would exist with dysfunctional alterations outside moral dilemma situations. A total of 22 criminal psychopathic men and 22 control subjects were assessed and fMRI maps were generated to identify (i) brain response to moral dilemmas, (ii) task-induced deactivation of the network during a conventional cognitive task and (iii) the strength of functional connectivity within the network during resting-state. The obtained functional brain maps indeed confirmed that the network subserving moral judgment is underactive in psychopathic individuals during moral dilemma situations, but the data also provided evidence of a baseline network alteration outside moral contexts with a functional disconnection between emotional and cognitive elements that jointly construct moral judgment. The finding may have significant social implications if considering psychopathic behavior to be a result of a primary breakdown in basic brain systems.ca_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported in part by the Fondo de Investigaciones Sanitarias de la Seguridad Social (Grants PI050884 and PI0011006); the Departament de Justícia de la Generalitat de Catalunya; National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC) Clinical Career Development Award (I.D. 628509 to B.J.H.); ‘Miguel Servet’ contract from the Carlos III Health Institute, Spain (to C.S-M.)ca_ES
dc.language.isoengca_ES
dc.publisherOxford University Pressca_ES
dc.relation.isformatofReproducció del document publicat a https://doi.org/10.1093/scan/nsr075ca_ES
dc.relation.ispartofSocial Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 2012, vol. 7, núm. 8ca_ES
dc.rights(c) Oxford University Press, 2012ca_ES
dc.subjectFunctional magneticca_ES
dc.subjectResonance imaging (fMRI)ca_ES
dc.subjectPsychopathyca_ES
dc.titleBreakdown in the brain network subserving moral judgment in criminal psychopathyca_ES
dc.typearticleca_ES
dc.identifier.idgrec018951
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionca_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccessca_ES
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1093/scan/nsr075
dc.date.embargoEndDate2025-01-01


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