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dc.contributor.authorNaudí i Farré, Alba
dc.contributor.authorJové Font, Mariona
dc.contributor.authorCacabelos Barral, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorAyala Jové, Ma. Victoria (Maria Victoria)
dc.contributor.authorCabré Cucó, Rosanna
dc.contributor.authorCaro, Pilar
dc.contributor.authorGomez, José
dc.contributor.authorPortero Otín, Manuel
dc.contributor.authorBarja, Gustavo
dc.contributor.authorPamplona Gras, Reinald
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-13T08:21:20Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.issn0939-4451
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10459.1/57026
dc.description.abstractMaillard reaction contributes to the chemical modification and cross-linking of proteins. This process plays a significant role in the aging process and determination of animal longevity. Oxidative conditions promote the Maillard reaction. Mitochondria are the primary site of oxidants due to the reactive molecular species production. Mitochondrial proteome cysteine residues are targets of oxidative attack due to their specific chemistry and localization. Their chemical, non-enzymatic modification leads to dysfunctional proteins, which entail cellular senescence and organismal aging. Previous studies have consistently shown that caloric and methionine restrictions, nutritional interventions that increase longevity, decrease the rate of mitochondrial oxidant production and the physiological steady-state levels of markers of oxidative damage to macromolecules. In this scenario, we have detected S-(carboxymethyl)-cysteine (CMC) as a new irreversible chemical modification in mitochondrial proteins. CMC content in mitochondrial proteins significantly correlated with that of the lysine-derived analog Ne-(carboxymethyl)- lysine. The concentration of CMC is, however, one order of magnitude lower compared with CML likely due in part to the lower content of cysteine with respect to lysine of the mitochondrial proteome. CMC concentrations decreases in liver mitochondrial proteins of rats subjected to 8.5 and 25 % caloric restriction, as well as in 40 and 80 % methionine restriction. This is associated with a concomitant and significant increase in the protein content of sulfhydryl groups. Data presented here evidence that CMC, a marker of Cys-AGE formation, could be candidate as a biomarker of mitochondrial damage during aging.ca_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was supported in part by I + D grants from the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (BFU2008-00335/BFI and BFU2011-23888), and BSCH-UCM (2009–2010) to G.B; grant from the Spanish Ministry of Health (PI11/ 01532) to M.P.O; and grants from the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation (BFU2009-11879/BFI), and the Generalitat of Catalunya (2009SGR00735) to R.P.P. Caro and J. Gómez received predoctoral fellowships from the Ministry of Education and Science.ca_ES
dc.language.isoengca_ES
dc.publisherSpringer Verlagca_ES
dc.relationMICINN/PN2008-2011/BFU2008-00335/BFI
dc.relationMICINN/PN2008-2011/BFU2011-23888
dc.relationMICINN/PN2008-2011/BFU2009-11879
dc.relation.isformatofReproducció del document publicat a https://doi.org/10.1007/s00726-012-1339-2ca_ES
dc.relation.ispartofAmino Acids, 2013, vol. 44, núm. 2, p. 361-371ca_ES
dc.rights(c) Springer Verlag, 2013ca_ES
dc.subjectAgingca_ES
dc.subjectCarboxymethylated proteinsca_ES
dc.subjectDietary restrictionca_ES
dc.titleFormation of S-(carboxymethyl)-cysteine in rat liver mitochondrial proteins: effects of caloric and methionine restrictionca_ES
dc.typearticleca_ES
dc.identifier.idgrec020169
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionca_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/restrictedAccessca_ES
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00726-012-1339-2
dc.date.embargoEndDate2025-01-01


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