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dc.contributor.authorRosell Polo, Joan Ramon
dc.contributor.authorLlorens Calveras, Jordi
dc.contributor.authorSanz Cortiella, Ricardo
dc.contributor.authorArnó Satorra, Jaume
dc.contributor.authorRibes Dasi, Manuel
dc.contributor.authorMasip Vilalta, Joan
dc.contributor.authorEscolà i Agustí, Alexandre
dc.contributor.authorCamp, Ferran
dc.contributor.authorSolanelles Batlle, Francesc
dc.contributor.authorGràcia, Felip
dc.contributor.authorGil Moya, Emilio
dc.contributor.authorVal, Luis
dc.contributor.authorPlanas de Martí, Santiago
dc.contributor.authorPalacín Roca, Jordi
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-20T12:07:22Z
dc.date.available2016-01-20T12:07:22Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.issn0168-1923
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10459.1/49352
dc.description.abstractIn recent years, LIDAR (light detection and ranging) sensors have been widely used to measure environmental parameters such as the structural characteristics of trees, crops and forests. Knowledge of the structural characteristics of plants has a high scientific value due to their influence in many biophysical processes including, photosynthesis, growth, CO2-sequestration and evapotranspiration, playing a key role in the exchange of matter and energy between plants and the atmosphere, and affecting terrestrial, above-ground, carbon storage. In this work, we report the use of a 2D LIDAR scanner in agriculture to obtain three-dimensional (3D) structural characteristics of plants. LIDAR allows fast, non-destructive measurement of the 3D structure of vegetation (geometry, size, height, cross-section, etc.). LIDAR provides a 3D cloud of points, which is easily visualized with Computer Aided Design software. Three-dimensional, high density data are uniquely valuable for the qualitative and quantitative study of the geometric parameters of plants. Results are demonstrated in fruit and citrus orchards and vineyards, leading to the conclusion that the LIDAR system is able to measure the geometric characteristics of plants with sufficient precision for most agriculture applications. The developed system made it possible to obtain 3D digitalized images of crops, from which a large amount of plant information – such as height, width, volume, leaf area index and leaf area density – could be obtained. There was a great degree of concordance between the physical dimensions, shape and global appearance of the 3D digital plant structure and the real plants, revealing the coherence of the 3D tree model obtained from the developed system with respect to the real structure. For some selected trees, the correlation coefficient obtained between manually measured volumes and those obtained from the 3D LIDAR models was as high as 0.976.ca_ES
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by the CICYT (Comisión Interministerial de Ciencia y Tecnología, Spain), under Agreement No. AGL2002-04260-C04-02. LMS200 and SICK are trademarks of SICK AG, Germany.ca_ES
dc.language.isoengca_ES
dc.publisherElsevierca_ES
dc.relationMICYT/PN2000-2003/AGL2002-04260-C04-02ca_ES
dc.relation.isformatofVersió postprint del document publicat a https://doi.org/10.1016/j.agrformet.2009.04.008ca_ES
dc.relation.ispartofAgricultural and Forest Meteorology, 2009, vol. 149, núm. 9, p. 1505-1515ca_ES
dc.rights(c) Elsevier, 2009ca_ES
dc.subjectTerrestrial LIDARca_ES
dc.subjectLaser measurementsca_ES
dc.subject3D Plant structureca_ES
dc.subjectTree volumeca_ES
dc.subject.otherArbresca_ES
dc.subject.otherRadar òpticca_ES
dc.titleObtaining the three-dimensional structure of tree orchards from remote 2D terrestrial LIDAR scanningca_ES
dc.typearticleca_ES
dc.identifier.idgrec013542
dc.type.versionacceptedVersionca_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessca_ES
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.agrformet.2009.04.008


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