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dc.contributor.authorVilella Mitjana, Felipe
dc.contributor.authorAlves, Rui
dc.contributor.authorRodríguez-Manzaneque Martínez, María Teresa
dc.contributor.authorBellí i Martínez, Gemma
dc.contributor.authorSwaminathan, Swarna
dc.contributor.authorSunnerhagen, Per
dc.contributor.authorHerrero Perpiñán, Enrique
dc.date.accessioned2014-05-16T15:25:46Z
dc.date.available2014-05-16T15:25:46Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.issn1531-6912 (versió paper)
dc.identifier.issn1532-6268
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10459.1/47216
dc.description.abstractA number of bacterial species, mostly proteobacteria, possess monothiol glutaredoxins homologous to the Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitochondrial protein Grx5, which is involved in iron–sulphur cluster synthesis. Phylogenetic profiling is used to predict that bacterial monothiol glutaredoxins also participate in the iron–sulphur cluster (ISC) assembly machinery, because their phylogenetic profiles are similar to the profiles of the bacterial homologues of yeast ISC proteins. High evolutionary cooccurrence is observed between the Grx5 homologues and the homologues of the Yah1 ferredoxin, the scaffold proteins Isa1 and Isa2, the frataxin protein Yfh1 and the Nfu1 protein. This suggests that a specific functional interaction exists between these ISC machinery proteins. Physical interaction analyses using low-definition protein docking predict the formation of strong and specific complexes between Grx5 and several components of the yeast ISC machinery. Two-hybrid analysis has confirmed the in vivo interaction between Grx5 and Isa1. Sequence comparison techniques and cladistics indicate that the other two monothiol glutaredoxins of S. cerevisiae, Grx3 and Grx4, have evolved from the fusion of a thioredoxin gene with a monothiol glutaredoxin gene early in the eukaryotic lineage, leading to differential functional specialization. While bacteria do not contain these chimaeric glutaredoxins, in many eukaryotic species Grx5 and Grx3/4-type monothiol glutaredoxins coexist in the cell.ca_ES
dc.language.isoengca_ES
dc.publisherWiley Interscienceca_ES
dc.relation.isformatofReproducció del document publicat a https://doi.org/10.1002/cfg.406 [untranslated]ca_ES
dc.relation.ispartofComparative and Functional Genomics, 2004, vol. 5, núm. 4, p. 328-341ca_ES
dc.rights(c) Wiley Interscienceca_ES
dc.subjectGlutaredoxinaca_ES
dc.subjectMitocondrisca_ES
dc.subjectTioredoxinaca_ES
dc.subject.otherMitocondrisca_ES
dc.subject.otherEstrès oxidatiuca_ES
dc.subject.otherCompostos organosulfurososca_ES
dc.titleEvolution and cellular function of monothiol glutaredoxins: involvement in iron-sulphur cluster assemblyca_ES
dc.typearticleca_ES
dc.identifier.idgrec009225
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionca_ES
dc.rights.accessRightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessca_ES
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1002/cfg.406


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